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Dorset
England

Poole

Poole is a coastal town and seaport on the English Channel. Lying between Dorchester, 24 miles away, and Bournemouth, 5 miles away, it is part of the unitary authority of Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council. It is the second largest town in the ceremonial county of Dorset.

Poole Harbour was formed during the last Ice Age, and is a drowned valley. Poole Quay has a variety to see, like the Poole Museum, which shares the local history of the town, as well as shops and cafés. The Old Poole Town, where pirates once stood, is just around the corner. If you’re looking for pirates in Poole today, the Poole Pirates are the town's motorcycle speedway team! Find Poole Stadium and you might see them going round the track.

Poole is also well known for its artistic side. The Lighthouse, or Lighthouse Poole, is an art centre, and is the largest in the UK outside of London. With a theatre, concert hall, studio, cinema, media suite, gallery, restaurant, and three function rooms, you’re guaranteed to find something to do there. You may also have heard of Poole Pottery. Although it no longer comes out of Poole, it did originate on the quayside in 1873, and you can see some in the V&A in London, if you want to make the two-and-a-half-hour drive.

Want to go somewhere more green? Poole Park has a playground, ducks to feed, the opportunity to do water sports and tennis. There are also three places to get food: The Kitchen, Scoops, and The Ark. You could also catch a ferry to Brownsea Island for red squirrels, which only takes 20 minutes by boat.

If you need some Poole Hotels while you explore everything the town has to offer, you could try the RNLI College which offers gorgeous sea views, or the historic 1895 Grovefield Manor.

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