How To Make An Origami Sheep: Easy Guide For Kids

Close up of hands folding paper to make origami animals, some origami birds lying on the table.
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Origami is one of the best activities for kids there is, because all it really needs is time and some paper, and you can create all wonder of folded shapes.

Kids can grab some craft paper or origami paper and fold animals, mystical creatures, flowers, buildings, and much more - there are even books released where you can fold Harry Potter themed projects! The possibilities are endless, and as your kids gain the confidence they can try a more complicated tutorial.

Origami is an ancient art that dates back to when paper was invented, and it's great to see so many children and adults continuing this activity so many years later. The word origami is Japanese, with "oru" meaning "to fold" and "kami" meaning "paper".

Did you know that origami has broken world records as well? In April 2017 eight people took 3 hours to construct the famous world's largest origami Rhino, which measured 7.83m long, and 4.06m high. That's one mighty piece of paper folding, but don't worry, there are much easier quicker projects.

In the latest of our origami projects, you can fold some easy paper sheep. Will you go for traditional black and white? Or something a bit more colourful? Each paper square makes two sheep, so you'll soon have enough for a flock! Time to grab some willing paper folders, find some space on the kitchen table, and start folding. When you've finished your sheep, maybe you can look up what other farm animals you could make? A paper farm would make a great playset for imaginative and creative play.

Close up of a woman with red nail polish folding a white piece of paper to make an origami sheep.

Origami Sheep Instructions

To Make Your Sheep You Will Need:

A square piece of paper coloured on both sides, measuring 24cm by 24cm. This will make two sheep.

1. Cut your square piece of paper in half, and put one half aside. Decide which colour will be the sheep's face, and lay facing up.

2. Fold the origami paper in half bottom to top, then open out. Fold both sides of the right end of the paper into the centre.

3. Make a fold lining up the bottom edge of the paper with the two triangles you've just folded, leaving a thin line between the two sections. Flatten the folds as you go.

4. Flip over your model from top to bottom, then fold the very top triangle over at the crease line just below.

5. Fold the top-right edge of the triangle over to line up with the centre. Open out at the crease line.

6. Insert your finger into the pocket formed by the outer triangle. Open this pocket and squash down to form a diamond shape.

7. Fold each side of the diamond in to form a kite shape, then open out.

8. Lift up the upper layer of the origami paper, and fold along the crease lines you can see inside (make a tall diamond) Fold the top part of this down.

Child sat on the floor folding tissue paper and paper to make origami animals.

9. Work on the left-hand flap of the diamond. Push from the back releasing this layer, folding it over the bottom layer. The top part will come over and point downwards in a long fork (almost like a fishes tail).

10. Hold the paper on the left side and repeat previous steps, pulling with a finger. The end result will look like a kite with two wings either side.

11. Still working on the face, fold the left-hand flap over, then fold the top right flap over/in half.

12. Then fold the top of this flap over and down to start making the sheep's ear.

13. Open out the left flap, fold the other side over the top, then repeat the previous step, lining up with the part underneath. Open out ready for the next step.

14. Put your fingertip inside the pocket on the right side, lightly pulling out that layer. The face will lift up and fall down again.

15. Fold the origami in half right side over left.

16. Lift up the top part of the paper, inserting the flap into the pocket so only a small part is showing. This is the finished origami sheep ear.

17. Turn over, and repeat, tucking the flap into the pocket to make another neat ear.

18. Flip over, and press down the folds and face. This is the back of the sheep.

19. Rotate the head around so it sits on the front of the sheep's body.

Pile of coloured paper fanned out with a ruler on top to make origami sheep.

20. Turn over to the back of the sheep again, this time folding the paper up in half creasing at the edge of the triangle.

21. Fold this layer in half downwards. Placing your finger at the top of the centre crease and make a fold from here to the outer left corner.

22. Repeat the previous step on the opposite side so you have two triangles, folded down from the centre crease line.

23. Lift this top piece up to find a pocket in the large triangle underneath. Insert the top piece in this pocket. Two triangles will show at the bottom, these are the sheep's legs.

24. Your easy origami animals are almost complete. Make a vertical fold across from the left-hand side, lining up with the inner edge of the nearest foot.

25. Fold along the diagonal edge of the triangle that's left (a mountain fold).

26. Unfold this triangle, grabbing where you made the mountain fold at the bottom of the crease line, then push the origami paper next to it underneath. This will leave a diamond shape.

27. Make a small fold across the top of the model to flatten the sheep head.

28. Turn the easy origami sheep over, folding under the bottom of the face to make a flat edge.

Top Tip: If you don't have any paper that is coloured on both sides, then you can use paint or pencils to colour/decorate white paper, or carefully hold two different sheets of patterned/coloured paper together as you fold.

If you'd like to follow a video or check your projects against completed models, then lookup Tony O'hare the designer of this origami project.

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Disclaimer

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